The Fair Tax – How Does It Work? #oktcot #tcot #fairtax #teaparty #fb

Abolish the IRS
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This section which explains how the Fair Tax operates is short, in essence, because the tax system is so simple.  This section concludes by demonstrating how the tax will work in the context of a couple with two children.

First, it is important to understand that under the Fair Tax several taxes will be repealed including the individual income tax, the alternative minimum tax, corporate and business income taxes, capital gains taxes, social security taxes, Medicare taxes, the self-employment tax, estate taxes, and gift taxes.[1] Instead, a 23 percent consumption tax on new items will be imposed at the retail level.  The consumption tax will not be imposed upon used or pre-owned items.  H. R. 25 uses 23 percent because that is the amount necessary to cover all current federal expenditures.   The beauty of the Fair Tax is that the 23 percent rate imposed in H.R. 25 can be lowered if spending cuts are made.

The consumption tax is collected by businesses dealing with taxable goods and services and remitted to the state governments, who will in turn pass the tax to the federal government.  Recall that purveyors of used items, like cars, would not collect the tax because used cars are not covered.  For collecting the tax, businesses and the states will receive one quarter of one percent of what they collect to cover the costs.

Finally, because it is important that everyone be treated fairly, including low income families, every family in America, no matter their level of income, will receive a prebate[2] check to cover the cost of taxes on the basic necessities of life.[3] Each head of household will receive this prebate every month to reimburse them for the sales tax they pay on all spending up to the federal poverty level.[4] The amount of the prebate will be determined by the government’s published poverty levels for various sized households.  To receive the prebate, the head of household will submit a list of those in the house along with their social security numbers to be placed in a database.  A person spending at the poverty level has a 0 percent effective tax rate while someone spending at twice the poverty level would have an effective tax rate of 11.5 percent.[5]

Using a couple with two children as an example, I’ll demonstrate exactly how the Fair Tax will work.  If they spend $45 on groceries a week under the current income tax system then when all of the embedded taxes are removed the price of those groceries will be lessened by around 22 percent to $35.10.  When the Fair Tax is added, the price of those groceries will be $45.58, which is only 58 cents more than they were paying.[6] However, under the Fair Tax this family will receive their entire paycheck back.  If the employers fail to take taxes out of price, the addition of formerly-withheld income taxes and payroll taxes to their paycheck will give them a 25 percent to 30 percent increase in take home pay.[7] The poverty level in 2009 for a family of four is set at $29,140[8] and the family will receive a prebate of $6,702 to be paid in twelve installments.[9]


[1] Boortz, p. 75

[2] An advance rebate

[3] Boortz, p. 79

[4] Boortz, p. 80

[5] Americans For Fair Taxation, http://www.fairtax.org, Karen Walby, Ph.D., February 16, 2009.

[6] Boortz, p. 84

[7] Boortz, p. 84

[8] Federal Register, Vol. 74 No. 14, January 23, 2009, pp. 4199-4201.

[9] Federal Register, Vol. 74 No. 14, January 23, 2009, pp. 4199-4201.

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5 Reasons the American Tax Payer Should Support the Fair Tax! pt 3 – Corporate Taxes #tcot #oktcot #fb

Fair Tax Fan
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This section seeks to make one simple point; the concept of the corporate tax is a farce.  When the legislature asks businesses to pay a corporate tax, the company has three choices.  They can pay the tax from their profits which mean the shareholders in the company, individual taxpayers, will receive smaller dividends from their investment in the company.  Another way to cover the cost of the corporate tax is for the company to increase the price of their product.  Under this more likely approach, an individual taxpayer will foot the bill of the corporate tax rather than the company shareholders.  Additionally, the company could lay off employees or cut back employee benefits to cover the cost.  Once again, individual tax payers, not the corporation, take the hit.[1]

Go ahead and re-read that paragraph.  The logic is sound and the corporate tax boils down to just another cost to the individual taxpayer through loss of profits, increased costs, or loss of jobs.  The Fair Tax, through elimination of the “corporate tax” brings us one step closer to a free market economy.


[1] Boortz, p. 33-34

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Published in: on April 23, 2010 at 10:19 am  Leave a Comment  
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